Under California law, sexual harassment is a form of discrimination based on sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions), gender, gender identity, gender expression, or sexual orientation. All employers must take all steps necessary to prevent sexual harassment.

Current law

Under the current law, employers with 50 or more employees must provide at least two hours of classroom or other “effective interactive training and education” regarding sexual harassment to all supervisory employees within six months of their assumption of a supervisory position and once every two years.

 Amended law

Under a new California law, by January 1, 2020, and once every two years thereafter, employers with five or more employees — including temporary or seasonal employees — must provide:

  • At least two hours of classroom or other effective interactive training and education regarding sexual harassment to all supervisory employees within six months of their assumption of a supervisory position; and
  • At least one hour of classroom or other effective interactive training and education regarding sexual harassment to all non-supervisory employees within six months of their assumption of a non-supervisory position.

Employer next steps

  1. Review your sexual harassment prevention policies to ensure they are consistent with the new law.
  2. If you are subject to the training requirements, consider revisiting and updating any existing training programs or, if none exist, identifying a training program that satisfies all the requirements of the law.
  3. HR Knowledge has a “California Sexual Harassment Prevention Program.” Please email us to learn more.

This content is provided with the understanding that HR Knowledge is not rendering legal advice. While every effort is made to provide current information, the law changes regularly and laws may vary depending on the state or municipality. The material is made available for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for legal advice or your professional judgment. You should review applicable laws in your jurisdiction and consult experienced counsel for legal advice. If you have any questions regarding this content, please contact HR Knowledge at 508.339.1300 or email us.